Education or Experience – What’s More Important?

If you were a recruiter given a choice between two candidates-one with a few years of industry experience and the other with excellent qualifications but no “real world” training-who would you choose?

There’s no easy answer to this question, as there is no clear winner in the age-old debate on the importance of education vs. the value of experience. With one random search on the Internet, you’ll find tons of people sitting on both sides of the fence. Pages and pages have been dedicated to the debate, but it seems far from being settled.

Those who think education has little bearing on success never tire of throwing out the names of famous university dropouts like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs to win their argument, while the proponents of a college education quote statistic after statistic to prove its impact on a person’s employability and earnings.

Education or Experience

So what’s more important-education or experience? The truth is that both have a place in a person’s career trajectory.

While someone with experience but no formal degree may be favored for certain jobs, he or she may find himself or herself reaching a saturation point in his or her career earlier and may struggle to advance professionally because the person is not considered adequately qualified. On the other hand, a college grad with the best education and book smarts may be completely at sea when it comes to dealing with real-world work situations if the graduate has no prior industry experience.

The truth of the matter is that it’s not so much about education vs. experience, but education and experience. They’re not mutually exclusive, but actually go hand-in-hand in charting out a person’s career growth.

The corporate landscape is getting more and more competitive with each passing day. Employers neither have the money nor the willingness to make huge investments in developing raw talent. They are more interested in acquiring talented candidates with demonstrated ability, and they look for a complete package at the time of hiring. That’s why someone who has solid educational credentials as well as real-world experience stands a better chance of making the cut.

Why is Education Important?

Companies are not just hiring with the aim to fill the current position, but have an eye on the future. If you have not already demonstrated that you have the potential to grow with a job, they may very well pass you up for another candidate who has shown that promise.

Having completed undergraduate degree program can demonstrate to them certain qualities in you. A college grad, for an employer, is often a person who has a proven academic record, has mastered complex subject matter, has the ability to think analytically and logically, and has been exposed to an intellectually stimulating environment.

In short, they see a person who has demonstrated that he or she can rise up the ranks and can be trusted with more responsible roles, rather than someone who can only perform tasks the person’s familiar with.

Make no mistake-just having a resume embellished with fancy undergraduate or graduate degree programs will not do the trick. Your employers expect you to bring to the table everything you have learned as part of your education and apply your skills and knowledge to solving real-world work problems.

How Do I Gain Experience?

As already mentioned, employers are looking for a perfect blend of experience and education in their employees. But the process of gaining experience has to start somewhere.

As a fresh graduate playing the field, you can wait for someone to give you that first break-or you can work toward getting your hands dirty with some real-world experience before you ever finish your formal education.

There are several ways of doing it: internships, co-operative work placements, industrial trainings, apprenticeships, freelancing, and more. Some academic programs have a mandatory practical training requirement, while others may need you to take the initiative.

With the right combination of a successful academic career and relevant experience in your field, you could be giving yourself a leg up against the competition.

Why Get an Auto Loan Quote Before Visiting the Dealer?

Would you go to the grocer without money and coupons in your pockets? Neither would I. But that’s what most people do when they go to the dealership to purchase a vehicle!

Let’s continue to use the grocery store analogy for a moment. You’ve filled your cart, you’re at the check out and your bill comes to a whopping $400 dollars. But, ah ha! You realized that you have coupons that you clipped totaling 25% in savings. That’s $100 off your bill! But here’s the catch. You left the coupons on the kitchen table. Do you think the check out person is going to trust you to go home and bring back the $100 dollars in coupons? You know the answer.

So why would anyone go into a dealership to buy a car without their coupons? And we’re not talking $400 dollars. We could be talking about $4,000.00 to $40,000.00 thousand dollars depending on the vehicle. But the reality is that most people put more planning into going to the grocery store!

Before you make your next vehicle purchase make sure that you have all your coupons. And by coupons I mean know your interest rate and the amount of months to pay back your loan. Knowing these two things can save you over $4,000.00 on a 48 month auto. Here’s how:

Two people go into the same dealership to purchase a $20,000 vehicle using the same buying terms EXCEPT the interest rates are different.

Buyer 1 comes in pre-qualified for a 4% rate, puts $1,000 dollars down and has a 48 month payment of $429. She pays a total of $20,592 for a 48 month loan.

Buyer 2 comes in submits an application at the dealership, he puts $1,000 dollars down and has a 48 month payment of $528.78. He pays a total of $25,381.44 for a 48 month loan. His interest rate is a whopping 15%! And he paid $4,789.00 dollars more for the exact same vehicle!

This happens everyday at dealerships across the nation. Now granted, interest rate is based upon credit. So the person that pays 15% may be getting the best rate based upon his or her credit and other factors. But wouldn’t you like to know that before entering a dealership?

All dealerships are in business to make money or they would be quickly out of business. Dealerships also deal with the educated and uneducated consumer. Take a guess on who they make the most money from? So, which consumer do you want to be?

So what’s the difference between the educated and the uneducated consumer? Simple, the educated consumer gathers their facts and figures before coming into the dealership. The days of driving from dealership to dealership are quickly fading. Educated consumers are time challenged and looking for convenient – One stop shopping.

So how do you become the educated? Get the dealerships to send you quotes by email, compare them and make them an offer. They are in business to sell autos!

Here’s the 4 step plan:

1.) Submit your online application ONCE and get quotes from 5 different dealers (Convenience).

2.) Compare offers from the competing dealerships.

3.) Make your offer.

4.) Pick up your vehicle!

That’s it!

The Education Enigma

Title: The Education Enigma
Author: Bruce Deitrick Price
Publisher: Word-Wise Publishing
ISBN: 1-4392-3035-8
ISBN-13: 978-1439230350

The Education Enigma is a book of essays pertaining to America’s education system. The question Price poses is: What Happened to American Education? Price proclaims, “The simultaneous decline of American education and the language used by America’s educators is a historical fact.” Over the years I have done some research on this topic, in particular through editing and proofreading of college papers. I found this book very interesting and agree with much of what Price states.

The main crux of Price’s essays deal with the failure of our teaching methods to actually teach children to read. He explains the difference between teaching children to read using whole word strategy and phonics, favoring phonics. According to Price, “When we examine education throughout the 20th century, we see a puzzling array of unproductive ideas. But no failure is as primal and destructive as the inability of American public schools to teach reading-the one essential skill.”

Through his essays Price also touches on the subjects of math, history, science and art. In addition, he provides a history of the American education system along with its downward turn referring to it as the “dumbing down” of America. From John Dewey to Maria Montessori to Rudolf Flesch to Gilbert Highet, Price explains their philosophies and the affects on this country’s education system. He concludes, specifically in regard to Dewey and his followers, “Make no mistake, this was a secret conspiracy.”

Along with this Price argues an excellent point that I always disagreed with: children need to memorize facts and figures even if they can look the answers up, whether in a book or online. I always believed that as long as children were taught where and how to look up answers there is no need for state tests that cause stress for many of our children from fourth grade up. His comment toward this kind of theorizing is: “But will they? No, people usually muddle through with what they actually know in their heads.” I do tend to agree with this point even though I still feel there is too much emphasis placed on state tests.

The Education Enigma is full of information and history pertaining to the American education system. Through some of the titles of his essays it’s easy to see that Price has a sense of humor: Jay Leno: Educator of the Year; Phooey on John Dewey; and Educators are Best Understood as “Ignorance Engineers.”

It is important to mention that Price is not hurling these jabs pertaining to the ineffectiveness of the school system at the teachers in the trenches. It is aimed at those in control of creating and enforcing inadequate teaching strategies. In Price’s words, “When I speak of “educators,” I never mean teachers. I mean that small group of managers at the top, with Ph.D.’s, who effectively control the public schools.”

A final quote from this book that I especially liked: “…Another famous government report, A Nation at Risk (1983) concluded that our public schools seem to have been created by an enemy power. Exactly. An enemy that would want Americans to read feebly and count inaccurately.”

About the author: Bruce Deitrick Price is a novelist, painter, poet and education activist. He graduated from Norfolk Academy and Princeton (with Honors in English Literature). Throughout his career, Price was writing about education. Aside from the arts, his main passion is Improve-Education.org. Price is a member of PEN and Mensa.

Graduation Quotes – 10 Tips to Find Just the Right Wording to Use For Your Graduation Party

If you’re planning a graduation party, you may decide to personalize invitations, favors or even the top of the cake with an inspirational quote. But don’t worry if you’re at a loss for words. Here’s ten tips to help you find the right quotation or saying for your grad.

1. Start the search. The best and easiest place to search for graduation quotes is online. There are many websites devoted entirely to categorized quotations. But you might get even better results elsewhere on the internet. Check scrapbooking web pages with sections devoted to wording for special occasions. Even companies that sell personalized items for grads, such as invitations, can have a whole list of great suggestions.

2. Begin your own list of any graduation quotes that appeal to you. Don’t spend too much analyzing whether this is the one you want to use. Once you have gathered a selection, you can go back and decide.

3. Keep it short and sweet. If you’re looking for a great graduation quote to use on your invitations, favors or other personalized items, you won’t have a lot of extra room for wording. Choose quotations that are brief and to the point. For example, “Hitch your wagon to a star” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) only uses a few words, but it’s effective.

4. Focus on education. If you want to put the emphasis on your past years in school, you could look at quotes that emphasize your learning experience, for instance:

* An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest. -Benjamin Franklin
* Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today. -Malcolm X

5. Believe in your dreams. Another way to go, is to look forward to the start of new things. Every graduate has hopes for the future. You can share that viewpoint with an appropriate quote, such as:

* Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined. -Henry David Thoreau
* The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. -Eleanor Roosevelt
* Throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

6. Define success. Instead of looking at dreams for the future, you could offer a definition of what you believe success will mean to you. Some ideas that would work are:

* Don’t aim for success if you want it; just do what you love and believe in, and it will come naturally. -David Frost
* Success isn’t a result of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire. -Arnold H. Glasow
* There are no shortcuts to any place worth going. -Beverly Sills

7. Be yourself. Another good category for graduation quotes are those that encourage you to stay true to yourself, such as:

* It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are. -e.e. cummings
* Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine. -Anthony J. D’Angelo

8. Borrow a line from a song. Meaningful lyrics to your favorite music might be appropriate for the occasion if it’s inspiring and uplifting. Think about music that moves and motivates you, and you may have found just the right graduation wording.

9. Don’t rule out funny. There’s nothing wrong with using a humorous graduation quote for your party. Here’s a couple of cute ideas:

* The tassel’s worth the hassle!
* Present Graduate – Future Millionaire!

10. Go over your list. After you have searched for quotations on the subject of graduation, education, dreams, and success, dig even deeper. If you still need a few extra contenders, try checking your favorite search engine for quote topics using keywords such as character, achievement, courage, confidence, goals, ideas, happiness, persistence and work. After you have assembled your collection, take your time reviewing them. Look for the words that inspire you.

So, don’t settle for someone else’s idea for an inspirational quotation. Let your feelings, beliefs and goals influence you. Whether you’re looking to personalize party favors, invitations, a banner, cake or anything else for your celebration, there is an abundance of great sayings from which to choose. Do your homework and you’ll find the perfect gradation quote for you.

Green Tongues – Quotes about Gardening

From the gardener who tends a single geranium in her windowsill, to the one who supplies bountiful bouquets of roses to floral shops, many people have spoken many words about the art and skill and benefits of gardening. Let’s listen in to some of their voices, historical and contemporary, for in them we may discover the gardener deep within the soil of our soul:

Gardening gives one back a sense of proportion about everything – except itself. ~May Sarton, Plant Dreaming Deep, 1968.

The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before.–Vita Sackville-West, 1892 – 1962.

My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes I made while learning to see things from the plant’s point of view. ~H. Fred Ale.

I have found, through years of practice, that people garden in order to make something grow; to interact with nature; to share, to find sanctuary, to heal, to honor the earth, to leave a mark. Through gardening, we feel whole as we make our personal work of art upon our land.–Julie Moir Messervy, The Inward Garden, 1995, p.19.

Gardening requires lots of water – most of it in the form of perspiration. ~Lou Erickson.

As the biocentric view suggests, the garden prospers when control is balanced by equal measures of humility and benevolence. A balance is struck. Control, servitude, respect, imagination, pragmatism, an ecological conscience, compliance, and a certain measure of mysticism and altruism all meld together to provide nurturance. Try to separate the various aspects into their constituent parts – grant any one of them the status of fundamental gardening definition and one soon skews the entire process. Put them back together again in the service of the two-way street called nurturance, and we express the state of grace called gardening.–Jim Nollman, Why We Garden: Cultivating a Sense of Place, 1994, p. 106.

There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling. ~Mirabel Osler.

The home gardener is part scientist, part artist, part philosopher, part plowman.
He modifies the climate around his home.–John R. Whiting.

Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets used to it.–Unknown.

Gardening is an exercise in optimism. Sometimes, it is a triumph of hope over experience.–Marina Schinz.

The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for him there. ~George Bernard Shaw, The Adventures of the Black Girl in Her Search for God, 1932.

Science, or para-science, tells us that geraniums bloom better if they are spoken to. But a kind word every now and then is really quite enough. Too much attention, like too much feeding, and weeding and hoeing, inhibits and embarrasses them. ~Victoria Glendinning.

In gardens, beauty is a by-product. The main business is sex and death. ~Sam Llewelyn.

The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses. ~Hanna Rion.

In my garden there is a large place for sentiment. My garden of flowers is also my garden of thoughts and dreams. The thoughts grow as freely as the flowers, and the dreams are as beautiful. ~Abram L. Urban.

It is good to be alone in a garden at dawn or dark so that all its shy presences may haunt you and possess you in a reverie of suspended thought. ~James Douglas, Down Shoe Lane.

Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans. ~Marcelene Cox.

God made rainy days so gardeners could get the housework done. ~Unknown.

I used to visit and revisit it a dozen times a day, and stand in deep contemplation over my vegetable progeny with a love that nobody could share or conceive of who had never taken part in the process of creation. It was one of the most bewitching sights in the world to observe a hill of beans thrusting aside the soil, or a rose of early peas just peeping forth sufficiently to trace a line of delicate green. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses from and Old Manse.

Don’t wear perfume in the garden – unless you want to be pollinated by bees. ~Anne Raver.

Take thy plastic spade,

It is thy pencil; take thy seeds, thy plants,

They are thy colours.~William Mason, The English Garden, 1782.

It is a golden maxim to cultivate the garden for the nose, and the eyes will take care of themselves. ~Robert Louis Stevenson.

Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity. ~Lindley Karstens, noproblemgarden.com.

I know that if odour were visible, as colour is,
I’d see the summer garden in rainbow clouds.~Robert Bridges, “Testament of Beauty”.

Unemployment is capitalism’s way of getting you to plant a garden. ~Orson Scott Card.

How fair is a garden amid the trials and passions of existence. ~Benjamin Disraeli.

Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing: -“Oh, how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade. ~Rudyard Kipling, “The Glory of the Garden”.

You can bury a lot of troubles digging in the dirt. ~Unknown.

Garden writing is often very tame, a real waste when you think how opinionated, inquisitive, irreverent and lascivious gardeners themselves tend to be. Nobody talks much about the muscular limbs, dark, swollen buds, strip-tease trees and unholy beauty that have made us all slaves of the Goddess Flora. ~Ketzel Levine’s talkingplants.com.

On every stem, on every leaf,… and at the root of everything that grew, was a professional specialist in the shape of grub, caterpillar, aphis, or other expert, whose business it was to devour that particular part. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Half the interest of a garden is the constant exercise of the imagination. ~Mrs. C.W. Earle, Pot-Pourri from a Surrey Garden, 1897.

No two gardens are the same. No two days are the same in one garden. ~Hugh Johnson.

We have descended into the garden and caught three hundred slugs. How I love the mixture of the beautiful and the squalid in gardening. It makes it so lifelike. ~Evelyn Underhill, Letters.

I think that if ever a mortal heard the voice of God it would be in a garden at the cool of the day. ~F. Frankfort Moore, A Garden of Peace.

Last night, there came a frost, which has done great damage to my garden…. It is sad that Nature will play such tricks on us poor mortals, inviting us with sunny smiles to confide in her, and then, when we are entirely within her power, striking us to the heart. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks.

Despite the gardener’s best intentions, Nature will improvise. ~Michael P. Garafalo, gardendigest.com.

Many things grow in the garden that were never sown there. ~Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732.

In order to live off a garden, you practically have to live in it. ~Frank McKinney Hubbard.

Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk undisturbed. ~Walt Whitman.

Gardens always mean something else, man absolutely uses one thing to say another. ~Robert Harbison, Eccentric Spaces, 1977.

Gardens… should be like lovely, well-shaped girls: all curves, secret corners, unexpected deviations, seductive surprises and then still more curves. ~H.E. Bates, A Love of Flowers.

I never had any other desire so strong, and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always, that I might be master at last of a small house and a large Garden. ~Abraham Cowley, The Garden, 1666.

One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides. ~W.E. Johns, The Passing Show.

Earth is here so kind, that just tickle her with a hoe and she laughs with a harvest. ~Douglas William Jerrold, about Australia, A Land of Plenty.

I have never had so many good ideas day after day as when I worked in the garden. ~John Erskine.

Green fingers are the extension of a verdant heart. ~Russell Page.

There is no gardening without humility. Nature is constantly sending even its oldest scholars to the bottom of the class for some egregious blunder. ~Alfred Austin.

It is utterly forbidden to be half-hearted about gardening. You have got to love your garden whether you like it or not. ~W.C. Sellar & R.J. Yeatman, Garden Rubbish, 1936.

A garden was the primitive prison, till man with Promethean felicity and boldness, luckily sinned himself out of it. ~Charles Lamb, 1830.

Let no one think that real gardening is a bucolic and meditative occupation. It is an insatiable passion, like everything else to which a man gives his heart. ~Karel Čapek, The Gardener’s Year, translated by M. and R. Weatherall, 1931.

Most people who possess anything like an acre, or half of it, contribute weekly to the support of a gentleman known as Jobbing Gardener. You are warned of the danger that he may prove to be Garden Pest no 1. ~C.E. Lucas-Phillips, The New Small Garden.

Tomatoes and squash never fail to reach maturity. You can spray them with acid, beat them with sticks and burn them; they love it. ~S.J. Perelman, Acres and Pains, 1951.

I appreciate the misunderstanding I have had with Nature over my perennial border. I think it is a flower garden; she thinks it is a meadow lacking grass, and tries to correct the error. ~Sara Stein, My Weeds, 1988.

It takes a while to grasp that not all failures are self-imposed, the result of ignorance, carelessness or inexperience. It takes a while to grasp that a garden isn’t a testing ground for character and to stop asking, what did I do wrong? Maybe nothing. ~Eleanor Perényi, Green Thoughts, 1981.

The kiss of the sun for pardon,
The song of the birds for mirth,
One is nearer God’s heart in a garden
Than anywhere else on earth.~Dorothy Frances Gurney, “Garden Thoughts”.

I don’t think we’ll ever know all there is to know about gardening, and I’m just as glad
there will always be some magic about it!–Barbara Damrosc.h

Gardening is civil and social, but it wants the vigor and freedom of the forest and the outlaw. ~Henry David Thoreau.

It is always exciting to open the door and go out into the garden for the first time on any day.–Marion Cran.

Gardening is a kind of disease. It infects you, you cannot escape it. When you go visiting, your eyes rove about the garden; you interrupt the serious cocktail drinking because of an irresistible impulse to get up and pull a weed. ~Lewis Gannit.

Gardening is any way that humans and nature come together with the intent of creating beauty.–Tina James, 1999.

When you have done your best for a flower, and it fails, you have some reason to be aggrieved. ~Frank Swinnerton.

Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are.–Alfred Austin.

A garden really lives only insofar as it is an expression of faith, the embodiment of a hope and a song of praise.–Russell Page, The Education of a Gardener, 1962.

The best fertilizer is the gardener’s shadow. ~Unknown.

Gardening is a labour full of tranquility and satisfaction; natural and instructive, and as such contributes to the most serious contemplation, experience, health and longevity.–John Evelyn, 1666.

By the time one is eighty, it is said, there is no longer a tug of war in the garden with the May flowers hauling like mad against the claims of the other months. All is at last in balance and all is serene. The gardener is usually dead, of course. ~Henry Mitchell, The Essential Earthman, 1981.

What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. ~Charles Dudley Warner, My Summer in a Garden, 1871.

Gardening is the art that uses flowers and plants as paint, and the soil and sky as canvas.
–Elizabeth Murray.

Copyright © 2006, Ian White Access 2000 Pty Ltd